Different Types of Beam Clamps You can choose From


Beam clamps are designed to suspend a hoist and are used in many lifting applications. To ensure safe lifting, they must be able to accommodate the weight of the hoist. There are different types of steel beams clamps with different capacities. Learn more about their uses and how to choose the right type for your application. For more information, see the Crosby IPU10 flyer. It provides a quick overview of the different types available.

Scissor beam clamp:

The basic type of beam clamp is the scissor beam clamp, which utilizes a scissor action to apply the clamping load. Because of its roughness, it makes a firmer grip. Before using a scissor beam, check that it has the appropriate SWL and is suited for the type of beam you are working with. The scissor beam is not recommended for use on larger or thicker beams.

U-bolt beam clamp:

The U-bolt beam clamp is another popular type of beam clamp. This clamp has a u-bolt on both sides and a bent plate. The plate is secured into place when you screw this into the beam, and the channel can be easily pulled or anchored. Both the bolts are threaded to ensure safety. These types of clamps are typically available in ten-ton capacities. If you need to secure a six-ton load, you can opt for a 10-ton model.

Bulb bar anchors and universal beam clamps:

Other types of beam clamps include bulb bar anchors, universal beam clamps, and specialist beam clamps. Each type has its own set of advantages and disadvantages. While the primary consideration is lifting capacity, you should consider the flange width and any additional requirements, such as shackles. To find the perfect beam-clamp, you should check the dimensions and specs of the beam you need to attach to.

When choosing a beam clamp, consider the size of the stud. Some clamps have smaller holes than others. Some clamps are threaded on both ends. Hex nuts can be used to secure a U-bolt to a beam. Some beams have multiple points that need to be fixed, such as in the middle of the flange. While a bolted beam clamp is an excellent option for lifting a six-ton load, you can also choose a 10-ton version to install the channel in different locations.